Is procrastination a mental illness?

Introduction

Is procrastination a mental illness? We all procrastinate at some point in our lives. Many of us are so used to delaying things that we forgot how it feels to finish everything on time and meet deadlines well before the due date. And while there is a thin line between putting things off and being successful, there are some people who simply procrastinate without any rational explanation for it.

We all have Procrastination

Procrastination is not a disease or illness. The term ” procrastination” describes a characteristic of human beings that helps us stay efficient and productive when we should be burned out or focused on other things. While some may think that procrastination is simply a matter of being too lazy to get started, I guess that most of us have at least a little bit of procrastination in us.
if you ask someone whether they think procrastination is a disease or a mental disorder, they might give you an answer that depends on what you’ve told them lately.

Human Tendency to postpone

Procrastination is not a mental illness. It is a normal human tendency to postpone or avoid action because of discomfort or worry. Think of it like the old saying: “When the going gets tough, some people start taking anti-depressants.”” Too many people indeed become mentally disturbed when they wouldn’t normally act on their thoughts or feelings, but that does NOT mean they have a mental illness.

We can Control our Habits

Procrastination is not a mental illness. To say someone has a mental illness is to imply that they cannot control their actions and habits, and this is generally not true. Genius author Daniel Goleman says we all have the power to change our habits and get things done more efficiently. He explains that some habits are harmful because they are resistant to change, whilst others enable us to accomplish great deeds. Some harmful habits include smoking, overeating, and drinking excessively; but for most of us, these are habits we can eliminate without professional help.

Procrastination can be helpful

Procrastination is not a mental illness. It is normal for us to be distracted by tasks that need doing and things that we want to do but haven’t done them yet. There is nothing wrong with this; in fact, it can be very helpful (in fact, it is one of the reasons I started this blog in the first place). We are human, and we make mistakes. But when you consistently fail to do things that matter, it gets under your skin and makes it difficult to work hard on any other tasks.

Procrastination  is not a Disease

Procrastination and its twin, sloth, are two behaviors that, when unchecked, can have devastating impacts on your happiness, career, and health. The reason why this happens is due to a lack of self-control. When you put something off, even for just a second, it can set your brain up to expect that something else will come naturally. But it doesn’t. procrastination is an invisible disease that takes a heavy toll on productivity.

No Cure for Procrastination

Procrastination is not a mental illness. There is no cure for procrastination, and it is not a sign of weakness or lack of willpower. Most of us who practice delaying gratification do so out of habit rather than conscious choice. But now and then our subconscious minds get the best of us, and we begin to repeat actions because of fears of failure or discomfort with decision-making. If you think about all the things you’ve done in your life—the things you wish you hadn’t done–and count how many of them were done without thinking about them first, you’ll begin to understand how procrastination can begin and end in unhealthy ways.

Procrastination can be Helpful

Procrastination isn’t a mental illness, although some may wish it were. It can be functional and useful in some situations; it can help you get things done when you lack energy or inspiration. But when it gets out of hand and becomes a habit, it can become more problematic than helpful. Some people with mental illnesses such as depression or anxiety become addicted to sleeping and drug use as a way to escape the day-to-day stresses that often accompany physical illnesses.

Conclusion

A big part of the reason we procrastinate is that we don’t know how to start. We think we’ll figure it out later, or that going into action now will make things easier. But any strategy or plan for getting things done involves some level of uncertainty. You can’t possibly know all the details about every step involved in getting your project done. So just because you’ve thought about something a lot doesn’t mean it’s a good idea.

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